NASDAQ Private Markets and Morrison & Foerster recently discussed the conditions a private company must satisfy in order to rely on Rule 506 for a private placement.  In this video blog, Anna Pinedo highlighted general reminders related to conducting a private placement; general solicitation considerations; approaching accredited and non-accredited investors; bad actor requirements; and Form D filings.

To watch this video, visit the NASDAQ Private Markets Resource Center.

 

NASDAQ Private Markets and Morrison & Foerster recently spoke about the process for a company that chooses to use general solicitation when raising capital in reliance on Rule 506.

In this video blog, Anna Pinedo discusses the types of communications that constitute general solicitation; reviews the SEC Staff’s guidance on general solicitation; and describes the heightened compliance requirements associated with Rule 506(c) transactions.

To watch this video, visit the NASDAQ Private Markets Resource Center.

NASDAQ Private Markets and Morrison & Foerster recently reviewed Rule 506.  In this video blog, Anna Pinedo focuses on the changes to Rule 506 brought about by the JOBS Act, Rule 506(b) and the conditions for the safe harbor, Rule 506(c) and the additional requirements associated with the use of general solicitation, and market practice.

To watch this video, visit the NASDAQ Private Markets Resource Center.

November 8-10, 2017

The Roosevelt Hotel
45 East 45th Street
New York, NY 10017

PLI’s 49th Annual Institute on Securities Regulation will be composed of seasoned individuals from private practice, investment banking, accounting firms, corporations, and government agencies. These experts will put the developments of the past year into proper perspective, and prepare you for 2018 and beyond.

Partner Anna Pinedo will participate in a panel discussion entitled “Private Offerings and Public Offerings by Smaller Reporting Companies” on day one of the program. Topics will include:

  • General solicitation and private offerings under Rule 506;
  • Integration of private to private and private to public offerings – what will it take to fix the uncertainty?;
  • Regulation A and Crowdfunding – are they working and where do they work the best?; and
  • Public capital raising by smaller reporting companies – what’s on the reform agenda?

Senior Of Counsel Marty Dunn will participate in a panel discussion entitled “Securities Law Grab Bag: Your Frequent Questions Answered” on day two of the program. Topics will include:

  • Our answers and analysis for important securities and compliance questions;
  • Avoiding the pitfalls in the offering process;
  • Making the right disclosure decisions under common (and not so common) scenarios;
  • Approaching the compliance function: our best practice answers;
  • Frequent governance considerations and the best ways to handle them; and
  • Do we have to close the trading window?

PLI will provide CLE credit.

For more information, or to register, please click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practising Law Institute’s Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings is the first practical, accessible resource to provide you with comprehensive legal, regulatory, and procedural guidance regarding these increasingly popular offering methodologies.

Authored by Morrison & Foerster Partners Anna Pinedo and James Tanenbaum, the third edition of Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings gives you a useful understanding of the applicable regulations and legal framework for these transactions, as well as the implications of these regulations for structuring transactions.

The treatise provides a detailed analysis of the regulations and guidance affecting exempt and hybrid securities offerings, as well as offers market context and practical structuring advice. Packed with checklists, transactional timelines, SEC guidance, and a wealth of labor-saving sample documents, Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings offers the relative advantages and drawbacks of the most commonly used forms of exempt and hybrid offerings. It clearly explains:

  • conducting venture private placements;
  • traditional and structured PIPE transactions;
  • institutional (debt) private placements;
  • Rule 144A offerings;
  • Regulation S offerings;
  • Regulation A offerings and crowdfunding;
  • shelf takedowns;
  • registered direct and ATM offerings;
  • confidentially marketed public offerings; and
  • continuous issuance programs, including MTN and CP programs.

This comprehensive three-volume treatise, with useful forms, has been updated to reflect changes brought about by the Dodd-Frank Act, the JOBS Act, the FAST Act, and other recent regulatory changes.

For more information, please click here.

In our Practising Law Institute treatise Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings, we refer to the concept of “integration” under the securities law as a bogeyman of sorts for practitioners. In this day and age of tweets and posts, and where public and “private” offerings are hard to distinguish from one another, is the concept of integration antiquated? Or is it perhaps due for a comprehensive re-examination by the Securities and Exchange Commission? As we discuss below, many of the fundamental principles of integration of offerings, aggregation of offerings for purposes of securities exchange rules, and communications issues like “gun-jumping” and “quiet periods” may have been so eroded as to no longer be meaningful.

To view our article, click here.

This article has been published in The Current: The Journal of PLI Press, Vol. 1, No. 1, Summer 2017 (© 2017 Practising Law Institute).

May 22 – 23, 2017

PLI New York Center
1177 Avenue of the Americas
(2nd Floor)
New York, NY 10036

PLI’s Private Placements and Hybrid Securities Offerings 2017 conference is designed for corporate and securities attorneys, compliance professionals, control room personnel, bankers and allied professionals who deal with private placements and other exempt and hybrid offerings. The faculty will address the changes to private and exempt offerings brought about by the JOBS Act, including matchmaking platforms, “accredited investor” crowdfunding, offerings using general solicitation, Rule 144A offerings, and the practical implications of these changes for issuers, broker-dealers and investment advisers. In addition, the faculty will address the basics of private placements, sales of restricted securities, Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1-1/2) transactions and block trades. The panelists will discuss the considerations that have led many companies to remain private longer and defer IPOs, while creating liquidity opportunities for holders through private secondary trading markets. Panelists will address the basics of traditional private placements, PIPE transactions, and Rule 144A transactions, as well as recent developments affecting each of these capital raising alternatives.

Partner Anna Pinedo will serve as chairperson for this event and will speak on the “Welcome and Introduction to Private Placements and Hybrid Financings” panel on Day One of the conference and on the “Welcome and Introduction to Conducting Hybrid Offerings” panel on Day Two. Senior Of Counsel Marty Dunn will speak on the “Overview of 4(a)(2) and Regulation D” panel on Day One.

To register for this conference, or for more information, please click here.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. EDT

Morrison & Foerster Partners Marty Dunn and David Lynn will host a teleconference entitled “Sending Your Message: Communications Rules for Offerings.” During this session, we will focus on the SEC’s communications rules applicable to public and private companies when they are engaged in securities offerings. We will discuss:

  • Materiality;
  • Press releases;
  • Research reports;
  • Non-deal roadshows;
  • Free Writing Prospectuses;
  • Regulation FD; and
  • General solicitation and general advertising, revisited.

CLE credit is pending for California and New York.

To register for this session, or for more information, please click here.

PLI’s Private Placements and Hybrid Securities Offerings 2016 conference on August 1-2, 2016, presents an expert faculty of leading practitioners and regulators as they discuss and analyze the changing regulatory framework and market for private offerings. The faculty will address the changes to private and exempt offerings brought about by the JOBS Act, including matchmaking platforms, “accredited investor” crowdfunding, offerings using general solicitation, Rule 144A offerings, and the practical implications of these changes for issuers, broker-dealers and investment advisers. In addition, they will address the basics of private placements, sales of restricted securities, Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1-1/2) transactions and block trades. The panelists will discuss the considerations that have led many companies to remain private longer and defer IPOs, while creating liquidity opportunities for holders through private secondary trading markets. Panelists will address the basics of traditional private placements, PIPE transactions, and Rule 144A transactions, as well as recent developments affecting each of these capital raising alternatives.

Morrison & Foerster Partner Anna Pinedo will serve as chairperson for this event and will speak on the “Welcome and Introduction to Private Placements and Hybrid Financings” panel on Day One of the conference and on the “Welcome and Introduction to Conducting Hybrid Offerings” panel on Day Two. Morrison & Foerster Partner James Tanenbaum will speak on a panel entitled “Regulation A+” on Day One. The conference will be held at the PLI New York Center in New York, NY and is scheduled to begin at 9:00 a.m. EDT.

To register for this conference, or for more information, please click here.

The SEC has not explicitly defined the terms “general solicitation” or “general advertising” in Regulation D under the Securities Act of 1933.  However, Rule 502(c) of Regulation D lists several examples of general solicitation and general advertising, including (1) any advertisement, article, notice or other communication published in any newspaper, magazine, or similar media or broadcast over television or radio and (2) any seminar or meetings whose attendees have been invited by any general solicitation or general advertising.  These are communications that are not targeted or directed to a specific individual or to a particular audience, but rather broad-based communications that may reach potential investors not known to the issuer or its financial intermediary.  Over time, the SEC Staff has provided guidance, mainly through no-action letters and more recently through Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations, regarding the types of communications that would be viewed as a “general solicitation.”  In our “Practice Pointers on Navigating the Securities Act’s Prohibition on General Solicitation and General Advertising,” we summarize the SEC Staff’s guidance in this area for issuers, broker-dealers and other third-party participants.

The practice pointers are available at: http://www.mofo.com/~/media/Files/Articles/2016/06/160600PracticePointersGeneralSolicitation.pdf