Many successful privately held companies are able to raise funds from institutional investors at attractive valuations and defer their IPOs.  Almost $49 billion was raised in late stage private placements (also referred to as “mezzanine” private placements or “pre-IPO” private placements) in 2017, an 18% year-over-year increase.  As in prior years, tech companies benefited most

For many years, most successful companies followed a relatively predictable capital-raising path. A lot has changed. The companies that tend to pursue IPOs in recent years are more mature, better capitalized, and often seek to pursue IPOs for different reasons than did their predecessors. In our updated Short Field Guide to IPOs, we detail the

In a year of significant volatility, it is not surprising that there was increased reliance on PIPE (private investment in public equity) transactions.  Traditionally, PIPE transactions have provided a useful capital-raising alternative when the public markets are inhospitable.  During this past year, energy companies relied on PIPE transactions in order to recapitalize their companies and

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We can help you keep your head above water.

Sometimes the water is deep and can get choppy. You may find that the 11th edition of our Capital Markets and Securities FAQs can help you get to firm ground.

The FAQs (or Frequently Asked Questions),

As privately held companies choose to remain private longer and defer their initial public offerings (IPOs), these companies are increasingly reliant on raising capital in successive private placements. For companies in the life sciences sector, for instance, a late-stage private (or mezzanine) placement made to known and well-regarded life science investors may serve to validate

Volatile markets often require issuers to raise capital through PIPE transactions. We have collected data regarding PIPE transactions in the below infographic:PIPE Infographic_WEB

 

Last week, the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board published its SASB Implementation Guide for Companies. The SASB Implementation Guide is a reference document for issuers who are in the process of integrating SASB standards into their existing 10-K or 20-F disclosure processes. The Guide is intended to help companies achieve three objectives: 1) identify the industry-specific