Practising Law Institute’s Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings is the first practical, accessible resource to provide you with comprehensive legal, regulatory, and procedural guidance regarding these increasingly popular offering methodologies.

Authored by Morrison & Foerster Partners Anna Pinedo and James Tanenbaum, the third edition of Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings gives you a useful understanding of the applicable regulations and legal framework for these transactions, as well as the implications of these regulations for structuring transactions.

The treatise provides a detailed analysis of the regulations and guidance affecting exempt and hybrid securities offerings, as well as offers market context and practical structuring advice. Packed with checklists, transactional timelines, SEC guidance, and a wealth of labor-saving sample documents, Exempt and Hybrid Securities Offerings offers the relative advantages and drawbacks of the most commonly used forms of exempt and hybrid offerings. It clearly explains:

  • conducting venture private placements;
  • traditional and structured PIPE transactions;
  • institutional (debt) private placements;
  • Rule 144A offerings;
  • Regulation S offerings;
  • Regulation A offerings and crowdfunding;
  • shelf takedowns;
  • registered direct and ATM offerings;
  • confidentially marketed public offerings; and
  • continuous issuance programs, including MTN and CP programs.

This comprehensive three-volume treatise, with useful forms, has been updated to reflect changes brought about by the Dodd-Frank Act, the JOBS Act, the FAST Act, and other recent regulatory changes.

For more information, please click here.

October 19-20, 2017

PLI California Center
685 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94105

This program will enhance your understanding of business strategies, accounting fundamentals and vocabulary used by management, investors, auditors and bankers. Practical advice and application of information to actual situations and financial reports will provide participants with opportunities to immediately implement growth and broaden capabilities.

Partner Anna Pinedo will host a session entitled “Financing Alternatives” on day one of the program. Topics will include:

  • Common financing alternatives — debt, equity and hybrids;
  • Sources of funding: public and private markets – the roles of advisors in different transactions;
  • Liquidity: Raising and deploying capital;
  • Explain the dimensions of capital management; and
  • The challenges of effective management of capital.

PLI will provide CLE credit.

For more information, or to register, please click here.

September 7, 2017

PLI New York Center
1177 Avenue of the Americas
(2nd Floor)
New York, NY 10036

With the Title III federal public crowdfunding provisions of the JOBS Act finally becoming fully effective in May 2016 and a new administration, what does the future hold for marketplace lending and crowdfunding? Will it be a boom or bust? Will Regulation A+ start to pick up speed and grow into the potential many predicted? Will Marketplace Lending finally have a principal regulator or will it continue to have its heels nipped by a patchwork of state and federal rulemakers and the courts?

Partner Anna Pinedo will speak on a panel entitled “Challenges in Running an Equity Crowdfunding Platform.” Topics will include:

  • Crowdfunding under Title II – Solicitation vs. Non-Solicitation;
  • “Reasonable Steps to Verify”;
  • The preexisting relationship and CitizenVC: Myth vs. Facts;
  • Working with broker-dealers and other intermediaries; and
  • Liquidity and secondary markets including the FAST Act and Section 4(a)(7).

PLI will provide CLE credit.

For more information, or to register, please click here.

July 13 – 14, 2017

PLI New York Center
1177 Avenue of the Americas
(2nd Floor)
New York, NY 10036

PLI’s Understanding the Securities Laws 2017 conference will provide an overview and discussion of the basic aspects of the U.S. federal securities laws by leading in-house and law firm practitioners as well as SEC staff. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay among the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Act, the JOBS Act, the securities related provisions of the FAST Act, related SEC regulations and significant legislative and regulatory changes and proposals made in the wake of the 2016 election.

Morrison & Foerster Partner Anna Pinedo will lead a session entitled “Securities Act Exemptions” on Day One of the program. Topics will include:

  • Exempt securities versus exempt transactions;
  • Private placements, including  offerings under Rules 504 and 506 of Regulation D;
  • Regulation A+ offerings;
  • “Intrastate” offerings, including new Rule 147A ;
  • Crowdfunding;
  • Employee equity awards;
  • Rule 144A offerings;
  • Regulation S offerings to “non-U.S. persons”; and
  • Resales of restricted and controlled securities:  Rule 144, Section 4(a)(7) and 4(a)(1½).

PLI will provide CLE credit.

For more information, or to register, please click here.

May 22 – 23, 2017

PLI New York Center
1177 Avenue of the Americas
(2nd Floor)
New York, NY 10036

PLI’s Private Placements and Hybrid Securities Offerings 2017 conference is designed for corporate and securities attorneys, compliance professionals, control room personnel, bankers and allied professionals who deal with private placements and other exempt and hybrid offerings. The faculty will address the changes to private and exempt offerings brought about by the JOBS Act, including matchmaking platforms, “accredited investor” crowdfunding, offerings using general solicitation, Rule 144A offerings, and the practical implications of these changes for issuers, broker-dealers and investment advisers. In addition, the faculty will address the basics of private placements, sales of restricted securities, Rule 144 and Section 4(a)(1-1/2) transactions and block trades. The panelists will discuss the considerations that have led many companies to remain private longer and defer IPOs, while creating liquidity opportunities for holders through private secondary trading markets. Panelists will address the basics of traditional private placements, PIPE transactions, and Rule 144A transactions, as well as recent developments affecting each of these capital raising alternatives.

Partner Anna Pinedo will serve as chairperson for this event and will speak on the “Welcome and Introduction to Private Placements and Hybrid Financings” panel on Day One of the conference and on the “Welcome and Introduction to Conducting Hybrid Offerings” panel on Day Two. Senior Of Counsel Marty Dunn will speak on the “Overview of 4(a)(2) and Regulation D” panel on Day One.

To register for this conference, or for more information, please click here.

On February 28, 2017, the SEC released a white paper analyzing crowdfunded offerings during the first six months following the effective date of Regulation Crowdfunding (May 16, 2016). The white paper noted that crowdfunding has thus far been attracting issuers that have not extensively utilized Regulation D.  Despite a relatively small sample size and a short observation period, the white paper makes, among others, the following observations:

  • There were 163 separate offerings by 156 issuers, seeking a total of approximately $18 million, excluding withdrawn offerings. The median offering amount was $53,000 and the average offering amount was approximately $110,000. However, almost all of the offerings accepted oversubscriptions up to a higher amount (typically close to $1 million) for a total amount of approximately $101 million.
  • As of January 15, 2017, approximately $10 million in proceeds was raised in 33 offerings by issuers filing a Form C-U. The median amount raised in these offerings was $171,000 and the average amount raised was approximately $303,000.
  • For offerings initiated in 2016, 24 were withdrawn by issuers or associated with an intermediary whose FINRA membership was terminated and funding portal registration withdrawn. These offerings sought a total of approximately $2.3 million (approximately $19.5 million if oversubscriptions are included).
  • Most of the offerings solicited in all states.
  • The most popular type of security was equity, followed by “simple agreements for future equity” and debt.
  • The most popular state of incorporation for issuers was Delaware and the most popular principal place of business for issuers was California.
  • The median issuer had under $50,000 in assets, under $5,000 in cash, $10,000 in debt, no revenues, and three employees. Approximately 40% of the issuers reported positive revenue and approximately 9% of the issuers reported a net profit in the most recent fiscal year. Among the issuers that reported non-zero assets in the prior fiscal year, the median growth rate was approximately 15%.
  • 21 intermediaries, including 13 funding portals and 8 broker-dealers, were involved in the offerings. As of December 31, 2016, 21 funding portals have registered with the SEC and FINRA and one funding portal had its FINRA membership terminated and withdrew its SEC registration. The median intermediary percentage fee was 5%, and intermediaries took a financial interest in the issuer in approximately 16% of the offerings.

A copy of the white paper is available at: https://www.sec.gov/dera/staff-papers/white-papers/RegCF_WhitePaper.pdf

Acting Chair Piwowar made remarks at the the Dialogue on Crowdfunding hosted by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Salomon Center for the Study of Financial Institutions at New York University.  In his remarks, Acting Chair Piwowar shared the following statistics regarding crowdfunding, noting that:  163 U.S. securities-based crowdfunding deals have been initiated, of which 33 have completed their fundraising.  Over $10 million has been raised since the regulation went into effect, with most offerings still ongoing.  There are currently 21 registered funding portals in the United States.  He also expressed concern as to whether the final rules are too restrictive or too burdensome and raised the possibility that the Commission consider steps to improve the regulations, including through the use of the Commission’s exemptive authority.

Commissioner Stein closed the session by noting some challenges.  Stein addressed the role of funding portals, noting that from May 2016 to January 2017, 27 crowdfunded offerings were withdrawn and of these 16 were hosted by the funding portal that was recently expelled by FINRA.  Along these lines, Commissioner Stein suggested revisiting the role of funding portals as gatekeepers for these transactions.  Stein also commented on the types of securities offered to date in crowdfunded offerings, which were predominantly equity (36%) and 26% of which were for SAFE securities.  She raised the possibility that the Commission should review whether SAFE securities are appropriate for retail investors.  Stein also noted concentration with the top five federal crowdfunding states accounting for 60% of offerings and over 90% of the total amount raised from completed offerings. The location of registered portals is heavily concentrated in California, Texas, and along the East Coast.

On February 28, 2017, the SEC’s Division of Economic and Risk Analysis (DERA) and New York University’s Salomon Center for the Study of Financial Institutions will host a dialogue on Securities Crowdfunding in the U.S.  The event, held at the SEC’s headquarters, will include a discussion on the economic rationale and legal framework for securities crowdfunding; a discussion on investor protection and capital formation in securities crowdfunding; and a presentation on the empirical evidence and data on securities crowdfunding.

Welcome remarks will start at 9:15 am.  The event is open to the public and will also be webcast on the SEC’s website.

At the 35th Annual Federal Securities Institute, a representative of the Securities and Exchange Commission shared some market data.

From its effective date in June 2015 through December 2016, there were 171 Regulation A offerings filed. Of these, 76 were Tier 1 offerings and 95 were Tier 2 offerings. The aggregate proceeds sought to be raised in the filed deals was approximately $3 billion. There were 97 offerings qualified. Thus far, $238 million has been reported sold, though more complete data will be available when issuers file their reports in a few months.

From its May 2016 effective date, 163 companies have filed to undertake crowdfunded offerings. The average minimum raise sought is $100,000 and the average maximum raise is $647,000. The average time period has been between four and six months. 28 deals have been completed raising approximately $8.1 milllion. 24 issuers failed to meet the minimum amount sought and withdrew their offerings.