Disclosure Requirements

Thursday, April 20, 2017
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EDT

During this session, we will review the benefits and accommodations available to foreign private issuers, or non-U.S. domiciled companies, that choose to access the U.S. capital markets. We will discuss assessing status as a foreign private issuer, the initial and ongoing disclosure requirements for foreign private issuers, liability considerations, and related topics. The speakers also will address important recent developments significant to foreign private issuers, including:

  • Recent Staff guidance regarding the foreign private issuer definition;
  • Areas of focus for SEC comments, including the use of non-GAAP measures;
  • Corporate governance developments;
  • Exhibits, HTML and XBRL for foreign private issuers and IFRS filers; and
  • Areas of likely SEC focus, including potential rollback of certain specialized disclosure requirements, the disclosure effectiveness initiative and related matters.

Speakers:

For more information, or to register, please click here.

Please contact cmg-events@mofo.com for a promotional code for 25% off tuition.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. EDT

After the 2016 decline in the number of U.S. initial public offerings (IPOs), commentators questioned whether the trend toward companies deferring initial public offerings and remaining private longer would be a new norm.  Already this year’s IPO market appears to be rebounding.  During the session, the presenters will discuss:

  • Whether cross-over (or late stage) private rounds still remain an important milestone on the road to the IPO;
  • U.S. IPO activity (sectors, VC- and PE-backed companies, foreign private issuer activity, syndicate structures);
  • Disclosure and governance trends among IPO issuers;
  • Dual track processes and the legal and business considerations;
  • Multiple share classes; and
  • Other developments.

Speakers:

CLE credit is pending for California and New York.

For more information, or to register, please click here.

At today’s Practising Law Institute SEC Speaks annual program, Acting Chair Piwowar made opening remarks.  During his wide-ranging discussion, Acting Chair Piwowar, inspired by William Graham Sumner’s the “forgotten man” referred throughout to the Securities and Exchange Commission’s investor protection mission and the objective of keeping in mind the interests of the “forgotten investor.”  Piwowar commented on the Commission’s focus on effective disclosure requirements and the need to be guided by the concept of materiality in formulating disclosure requirements.  He pointed to various specialized disclosure requirements introduced by the Dodd-Frank Act, including the resource extraction, conflict minerals and related matters.  Piwowar noted the importance of avoiding disclosure overload.  Piwowar also commented on Regulation D and questioned the utility of applying the “accredited investor” standard as a means of identifying individual investors that do not require the protection of the disclosures associated with registered offerings.

Providing a glimpse into upcoming actions, Piwowar noted that the Commission will consider whether to propose a request to comment on the requirements of Industry Guide 3 for offerings by financial services companies, consideration of a final rule requiring registrants that file registration statements and periodic and current reports that are subject to the exhibit requirements under Item 601 of Regulation S-K, or that file on Forms F-10 or 20-F, to include a hyperlink to each exhibit listed in the exhibit index of these filings and in order to enable the inclusion of such hyperlinks, to require that registrants submit all such filings in HTML format (see the proposed rule:  https://www.sec.gov/rules/proposed/2016/33-10201.pdf), a proposed rule relating to the use of inline XBRL data in filings, and amendments to Rule 15c2-12 relating to muni disclosures.

The use of non-GAAP financial measures by public companies continues to be an area of growing concern for the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Since the staff of the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance (the “Staff”) released its updated Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations on May 17, 2016, on the use of non-GAAP financial measures (the “Updated C&DIs”), the Staff has issued more than 200 comment letters related to non-GAAP financial measures that have become publicly available.

In this alert, we look at common themes or areas of concern identified by the Staff in these comment letters, as well as responses given by registrants. We also highlight pronouncements by senior members of the Staff on the important “critical gatekeeper” role audit committee members play in ensuring credible and reliable financial reporting, including compliance with the Updated C&DIs. Finally, we look at industry initiatives aimed at improving the dialogue among management, audit committee members, external auditors and other stakeholders with respect to the use and disclosure of non-GAAP financial measures.

Read our Practice Pointers: Anticipating and Addressing SEC Comments on Non-GAAP Financial Measures.

In a recent letter, the Chamber commented to the SEC’s Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies about the Committee’s consideration of the factors affecting the trend of companies remaining private and deferring their IPOs.  The Chamber’s letter attributes some of the “hurdles” of becoming a public company to the SEC’s complex disclosure requirements, recent specialized disclosure requirements, and the influence of proxy advisory firms on governance in U.S. public companies.  The Chamber recently published a white paper, Essential Information:  Modernizing Our Corporate Disclosure System, which addresses materiality as a guiding principle for securities disclosures and cautions against “special interest disclosure” requirements.  Presumably, the SEC will continue to advance the disclosure effectiveness initiative, which had been undertaken under former Chair White’s leadership.

The Chamber’s letter is available here:  http://www.centerforcapitalmarkets.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/2017.2.15-US-Chamber-Letter-to-SEC-re-advisory-cmte-meeting-on-companies-staying-private.pdf?x48633

The Chamber’s white paper is available here:  http://www.centerforcapitalmarkets.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/U.S.-Chamber-Essential-Information_Materiality-Report-W_FINAL.pdf?x48633

Bloomberg BNA announced the recently updated SEC Reporting Issues for Foreign Private Issuers (Portfolio 5507) authored by Morrison & Foerster partners Anna T. Pinedo and James R. Tanenbaum.

This portfolio serves as a practical resource for both practitioners and foreign private issuers.  This new edition explains in detail various SEC proposed and finalized rules and regulations issued in 2016. It analyzes how those regulations would affect foreign private issuers–including the updated SEC staff guidance on how foreign private issuers should disclose the use of non-GAAP financial measures.

Thursday, March 9, 2017
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST

As the Trump Administration takes charge in 2017, the only thing that seems inevitable is that the regulatory and enforcement outlook will change. Initial indications point to a desire to relax or repeal certain regulations that may be regarded as burdensome to public companies. Also, proposed legislation would relax certain corporate governance and compensation-related measures that formed part of the Dodd-Frank Act. Proposed legislation also would address the types of cost-benefit analysis that would be required to support proposed regulation.

Don’t miss this chance to learn SEC regulations’ status and how they will likely change from experts who have been directly involved in rule-making and implementation of U.S. securities laws.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Rules that were proposed but not adopted by the SEC as part of the Dodd-Frank Act rule-making mandate;
  • What to expect as far as corporate governance and executive compensation requirements;
  • Final rules adopted pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act mandate relating to extractive minerals and specialized disclosures;
  • Future of the Disclosure Effectiveness initiative;
  • Likely status of the rules proposed by the SEC and not yet adopted;
  • Proposed changes affecting investment companies and their likely status; and
  • Anticipated enforcement areas of focus.

Speakers:

  • Andrew J. “Buddy” Donohue
    Former Chief of Staff, Director of Enforcement, and Director of Investment Management, SEC
  • Roberta Karmel
    Centennial Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School,
    former SEC Commissioner
  • Robert Khuzami
    Partner, Kirkland & Ellis LLP, former Director of Enforcement, SEC
  • Troy Paredes
    Paredes Strategies LLC, former SEC Commissioner
  • Anna Pinedo
    Partner, Morrison & Foerster LLP

For more information, or to register, please click here.

Please contact cmg-events@mofo.com for a promotional code for discounted $99 tuition.

In this piece, which was included in a recent compendium published by Practising Law Institute (PLI) titled “Looking Ahead:  The Impact of the 2016 Election on Key Legal Issues,” we offer our thoughts on the likely areas of focus for the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Access here:  https://media2.mofo.com/documents/170100-securities-law-crystal-ball.pdf.

 

SEC disclosure requirements have prompted debate among key stakeholders regarding how to strike the right balance, weighing investor protection concerns and regulatory burdens. Partner Anna Pinedo is quoted in MergerMarket’s report on disclosure effectiveness. Read the report here: http://mergermarketgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Vintage-Group_Newsletter-3-2016_Final-LR.pdf.

As year-end approaches, many companies will be focused on preparing their annual reports.  Recent comments from various representatives of the Securities and Exchange Commission accounting staff emphasized the importance of maintaining strong and effective internal control over financial reporting (“ICFR”).  At the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Conference in Washington, D.C., SEC Chief Accountant Wesley R. Bricker and SEC Deputy Chief Accountant Marc Panucci both addressed ICFR.  Mr. Panucci stated that ICFR remains a significant area of focus for the SEC, including through the coordinated efforts of the SEC’s Office of the Chief Accountant, the Division of Corporation Finance and the Division of Enforcement.  Mr. Panucci also noted that earlier this year, the SEC brought and settled a case against an issuer, members of its management, the audit partner and the issuer’s third-party consultant involving the inadequate evaluation of an identified control deficiency.  Additional takeaways from their remarks include the following:

  • Management, audit committees and auditors should engage in regular dialogue on ICFR assessments, as timely and effective communication among these parties is important for accurate assessments of ICFR and reliable financial reporting that benefits investors.
  • Management has the responsibility to carefully evaluate the severity of identified control deficiencies and to report, on a timely basis, all identified material weaknesses in ICFR. Any required disclosure should allow investors to understand the cause of the control deficiency and to assess the potential impact of the identified material weakness.
  • It is important to maintain competent and adequate accounting staff to accurately reflect the company’s transactions and to augment internal resources with qualified external resources, as necessary.
  • Management has to take responsibility for its assessment of ICFR, and that responsibility cannot be outsourced to third-party consultants. At the same time, third party-consultants can play an important and critical role when assisting management in its evaluation of ICFR.

Mr. Bricker’s speech is available at: https://www.sec.gov/news/speech/keynote-address-2016-aicpa-conference-working-together.html.  Mr. Panucci’s speech is available at: https://www.sec.gov/news/speech/panucci-2016-aicpa.html.